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Tuesday
Sep262017

Crosswalks on Highway 9 to be installed.

High Intensity Activated Crosswalk Signal (HAWK)
(Also known as a Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon)
WHAT IS IT?
A HAWK acts like a traffic signal and is designed to catch drivers’ attention at pedestrian crosswalks and improve safety.
Because a HAWK operates similarly to a regular traffic signal, both drivers and pedestrians already have the skill set to respond easily and quickly, but they do not require traffic to stop unless a pedestrian needs to cross.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

There are several informative videos on the internet that show how HAWKs work. One example can be found at:        https://vimeo.com/223672024

Thursday
Jun292017

Tecumseh 2016 C.C.R. Report.

The Tecumseh 2016 C.C.R. Report was posted in the Tecumseh Countywide News June 29 2017.

 

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

Source of Drinking Water
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
- Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
- Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
- Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
- Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
- Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.
Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
if present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.


Tecumseh Utility Authority holds meetings on the first Monday of each month

Source Water Information

Source Water Name Type of Water Active 39689 Benson Park

TECUMSEH LAKE SW Active Hardesty Rd.

WELL 1 GW Active Hardesty Rd.

WELL 2 GW Active Hardesty Rd.

WELL 3 GW Active Hardesty Rd.

WELL 4 GW Active Hardesty Rd.

WELL 5 GW Active Hardesty Rd.

WES WATKINS RESERVOIR SW Active McLoud


2016 Regulated Contaminants Detected

Water Quality Test Results
Definitions: The following tables contain scientific terms and measures, some of which may require explanation.
Avg: Regulatory compliance with some MCLs are based on running annual average of monthly samples.
Level 1 Assessment: A Level 1 assessment is a study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why
total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.
Level 2 Assessment: A Level 2 assessment is a very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if
possible) why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible
using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a
MRDL: disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not
goal or MRDLG: reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

na:
cram:
ppb:
ppm:
Treatment Technique or TT:

not applicable.
mdilirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body)
micrograms per liter or parts per billion - or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.
milligrams per liter or parts per million - or one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water.
A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Regulated Contaminants
Disinfectants and Disinfection By- Products Collection
Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Chlorine 2016 1 1 1 MRDLG = 4 MRDLG = 4 ppm N Water additive used to control microbes.
Haloacetic Acids (HAAS) 2016 49 6.2 - 61.5 No goal for the total 60 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection
dot all sample results may have been used for calculating the Highest Level Detected because some results may be part of an evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur in the future
Haloacetic Acids 2016 49 6.2 - 61.5 No goal for 60 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection.
(HAAS) the total
Not all sample results may have been used or calculating the Highest Level Detected because some results may be part of an evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur in the future
Haloacetic Acids 2016 49 6.2 - 61.5 No goal for 60 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection.
(BAAS)* the total
of all sample results may nave been used or calculating the Highest Level Detected because some results may be part of an evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur in the future
Total Trihalomethanes 2016 57 2.13 - 84.4 No goal for 80 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection
(TTHM) the total
Not all sample results may have been used for calculating the Highest Level Detected because some results may be part of an evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur in the future
Total Trihalomethanes 2016 57 2.13 - 94.4 No goal for 90 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection.
(TTHM) the total
ample results may have been used or calculating the Highest Level Detected because some results may be part of an evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur in the future
Inorganic Contaminants Collection
Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Barium 2016 0.068 0.068 - 0.068 2 2 ppm N Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from
metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits.
Cadmium 2016 2 1.8 - 1.8 5 5 ppb N Corrosion of galvanized pipes; Erosion of
natural deposits; Discharge from metal
refineries; runoff from waste batteries and
Radioactive Contaminants Collection
Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Beta/photon emitters 11/24/2015 8.48 8.48 - 8.48 0 4 mrem/yr N Decay of natural and man-made deposits.

Combined Radium 226/228 11/24/2015 0.039 0.039- 0.039 0 5 pCi/L N Erosion of natural deposits.
Gross alpha excluding radon and uranium 11/24/2015 4.97 4.97 - 4.97 0 15 pCi/L N Erosion of natural deposits.

Total Organic Carbon
The percentage of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal was measured each month and the system met all TOC removal requirements set, unless a TOC violation is noted in the violations section.

RECZIVED
Pottawatomie County RWD No. 3
CCR 2017 JUN 0 2 2017
Annual Drinking Water Quality Report 2016 City of Tecumseh
We're very pleased to provide you with year's Annual Quality Water Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is surface water drawn from Lake Atoka which we purchase from the City of Oklahoma City.
I'm pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets Federal and State requirements.
If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Don Martindale at 405-383-2571. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings.
Pottawatomie County RWD No. 3 regularly monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. This table shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1'` to December 31, 2016. All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonable expected to contain at least small amounts of some constituents. It's important to remember that the presence of these constituents does not necessarily pose a health risk. In the table below you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions.
Parts per mill (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/I)
Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/l)
Picocuries per liter (pCi/I) — picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
Nephelometeri Turbidity Unit (NTU) — nephelometic turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average
person.
Treatment Technique (TT)-(mandatory language) A treatment technique is required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
Action Level (AL) —the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) — The MCL is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible
using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal — The MCLG is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow
for a margin of safety.
Lead and Copper
Definitions:
Action Level Goal (ALG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. ALGs allow for a margin of safety. Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
Lead and Copper Date Sampled MCLG Action Level (AL) 90th Percentile # Sites Over AL Units Violation Likely source of Contamination
Copper 2014 1.3 1.3 0.085 0 ppm N Erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing systems

Turbidity
Limit (Treatment Technique) Level Detected Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Highest single measurement 1 NTU 0.23 NTU N Soil runoff
Lowest monthly meeting limit 0.3 NTU 100 N Soil runoff

Information Statement: Turbidity is a measurement of the cloudiness of the water caused by suspended particles. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of water quality and the effectiveness of our filtration system and disinfectants.

Regulated Contaminants
Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely source of Contamination
Chlorine 2016 2 1-2 MRDLG=4 MRDL=4 ppm N Water additive used to control microbes
Haloacetic Acids (HAAS)* 2016 24 6.8-54.3 No goal for the total 60 ppb N By-Product of drinking water disinfection
Total
Trihalomethanes (TTHM) 2016 48 14.6-108 No goal for the total 80 ppb N By-Product of drinking water disinfection
Inorganic Contaminants Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely source of Contamination
Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen) 2016 0.26 0.26-0.26 10 10 ppm N Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.
Radioactive Contaminants Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Beta/photon emitters 6/25/13 1.01 1.01 — 1.01 0 4 mrem/yr N Decay of natural and man-made deposits

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonable be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water before we treat it include:
*Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife. *Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
*Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture and residential uses.
*Radioactive contaminants, which are naturally occurring
*Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also, come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
MCLS are set at a very stringent level. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect.
In our continuing efforts to maintain a safe and dependable water supply it may be necessary to make improvements in your water system. The cost of these improvements may be reflected in the rate structure. Rage adjustments may be necessary in order to address these improvements.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immune-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
Please call our office if you have questions.
We at Pottawatomie County RWD No. 3 work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap.

Wednesday
Jun102015

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report 2015

Source of Drinking Water
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pickup substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
- Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
- Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
- Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
- Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.
Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.qov/safewater/lead.

Source Water Information
Source Water Name
TECUMSEH LAKE
WELL 1
WELL 2
WELL 3
WELL 4
WELL 5
WES WATKINS RESERVOIR Type of Water
SW
GW
GW
GW
GW
GW
SW Report Status Location







2014 Regulated Contaminants Detected

Lead and Copper
Definitions:
Action Level Goal (ALG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. ALGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
Lead and Copper Data Sampled MCLG Action Level
(AL) 90th
Percentile # Sites Over
AL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Copper 08/29/2013 1.3 1.3 0.011 0 ppm N Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; corrosion of household plumbing systems.

Regulated Contaminants
Disinfectants and Disinfection By- Products Collection
Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Chlorine 2014 1 1 MRDLG = 4 MRDL = 4 ppm N Water additive used to control microbes.
Haloacetic Acids (HAAS)* 2014 40 0 - 70.7 No goal for the total 60 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection.
Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) 2014 69 0 - 124 No goal for the total 80 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection.
Inorganic Contaminants Collection
Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Barium 2014 0.121 0.121 - 0.121 2 2 ppm N Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits.
Fluoride 2014 0.3 0.25 - 0.25 4 4.0 ppm N Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.
Radioactive Contaminants Collection
Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Beta/photon emitters 2014 6.57 5.56 - 6.57 0 4 mrem/yr N Decay of natural and man-made deposits.
Combined Radium 226/228 2014 0.29 0.28 - 0.29 0 5 pCi/L N Erosion of natural deposits.
Gross alpha excluding radon and uranium 2014 1.71 0.074 - 1.71 0 15 pCi/L N Erosion of natural deposits.

Turbidity
Limit (Treatment
Technique) Level Detected Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Highest single measurement 1 NTU 0.268 NTU N Soil runoff.
Lowest monthly meeting limit 0.3 NTU 100 N Soil runoff.

Information Statement: Turbidity is a measurement of the cloudiness of the water caused by suspended particles. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of water quality and the effectiveness of our filtration system and disinfectants.

Total Organic Carbon
The percentage of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal was measured each month and the system met all TOC removal requirements set, unless a TOC violation is noted in the violations section.


Violations Table
Consumer Confidence Rule
The Consumer Confidence Rule requires community water systems to prepare and provide to their customers annual consumer confidence reports on the quality of the water delivered by the systems.
Violation Type Violation Begin Violation End Violation Explanation
CCR REPORT 07/01/2013 01/21/2015 We failed to provide to you, our drinking water customers, an annual report that informs you about the quality of our drinking water and characterizes the risks from exposure to contaminants detected in our drinking water.

Regulated Contaminants
Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely source of Contamination
Chlorine 2014 2 2-2 MRDLG=4 MRDL=4 ppm N Water additive used to control microbes
Haloacetic Acids (HAAS)* 2014 43 0 โ€”97.4 No goal for the total 60 ppb N By-Product of drinking water disinfection
Total
Trihalomethanes (TTHM) 2014 52 0 โ€”162.8 No goal for the total 80 ppb N By-Product of drinking water disinfection
Inorganic Contaminants Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely source of Contamination
Barium 12/6/2012 0.0316 0.0316-
0.0316 2 2 ppm N Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits
Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen) 2014 0.32 0.32-0.32 10 10 ppm N Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.
Radioactive Contaminants Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Beta/photon emitters 2014 1.01 1.01 โ€” 1.01 0 4 mrem/yr N Decay of natural and man-made deposits

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonable be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (80-426-4791).
The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water before we treat it include:
*Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife. *Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
*Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture and residential uses.
*Radioactive contaminants, which are naturally occurring
*Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also, come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
MCLs are set at a very stringent level. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect.
In our continuing efforts to maintain a safe and dependable water supply it may be necessary to make improvements in your water system. The cost of these improvements may be reflected in the rate structure. Rage adjustments may be necessary in order to address these improvements.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immune-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
Please call our office you have questions.
We at Pottawatomie County RWD No. 3 work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap.

Thursday
Jul032014

The Tecumseh Head Start Enrollment is now open!

Call 598-5114 For More Information.

Tuesday
Jul092013

City Of Tecumseh Community Resources:

 

THE OKLAHOMA DRUG CARD PROGRAM

QuitPal: An Innovative App to Quit Smoking

Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255

Suicide Prevention Webpage

Gambling Addiction Webpage